Grow and Sell Food with Commercial Aquaponics

Grow and Sell Food with Commercial Aquaponics 

Now is the time to install a Portable Farms Aquaponics System. 

Learn from us and be a food supplier in your area. 

Lettuce grown in Portable Farms using 95% water than traditional agriculture.

Feed your family with a backyard farm or grow food commercially! If you sell a head of lettuce for $3.00 instead of the new fore casted rate of $5.95, ONE SINGLE Grow Table would yield over $14,000/year, or pay off a 10,000 sq ft aquaponics installation is 11 months.

To learn everything WE KNOW about growing commercially, read our book, Commercial Aquaponics GOLD.

  • This comprehensive information about commercial aquaponics provides you will all the facts you’ll need to make an informed business decision about commercial aquaponics growing in controlled environment agricultural (CEA).
  • We’re also offering TWO FREE BONUSES with the purchase of Commercial Aquaponics GOLD: 1) A formal ten-step strategy business plan template designed specifically for commercial aquaponics growing to present to funders and, 2) PFAS LLC’s Executive Summary showing production and operating costs, profits and best-produce choices to achieve the shortest Return on Investment.

CLICK ON our fun video by the Crazy Professor, aka, Colle Davis, Inventor of Portable Farms, talk about commercial aquaponics and explain what his book Commercial Aquaponics Gold offers.

COMMERCIAL AQUAPONICS IS TRENDING 2017

 

According to MSN, April 25, 2017

A Severe Lettuce Shortage Is Putting a Dent in Your Wallet

© Provided by The Daily Meal A Severe Lettuce Shortage Is Putting a Dent in Your Wallet

The end of California’s epic drought has cost farmers their bumper crops — and cost average consumers a few dollars more on their grocery store bills. Leafy greens, cauliflower, and celery crops have been underwhelming this year, costing consumers around $1 more per head of lettuce. A head of iceberg lettuce could cost you $5.99 at your local supermarket, according to a report in the New York Daily News.

The reason for the lettuce shortage, scientists are saying, is counterintuitive. After a decade-long drought finally broke and was followed by a warm winter, unusually rapid snow melt and heavy rains adversely affected California crops, drowning plants and rendering many leafy green crops useless.

The cost of a box of celery heads has tripled since February, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The salad shortage could affect consumers until at least May, Roland Fumasi, a senior produce analyst for Rabobank in Fresno, California, told Bloomberg.

Although there are other regions in America that grow leafy greens (notably Arizona), California’s lettuce production accounts for about 71 percent of the total crop and can seriously sway the market one way or another.

 

Simplify Life. Eat Well. Live Long and Prosper.

Simplify Life. Eat Well. Live Long and Prosper.
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis

Phyllis Davis harvesting several kohlirabi. Kohlrabi is similar to the cabbage family with a taste much like a broccoli stem. Can be eaten raw or cooked.

 

Spring means throwing things away, washing windows, moving furniture and vacuuming underneath and simplifying our lives. We may hate doing it, but we love the results and it makes it happier.

You can make your life more resilient, less susceptible to shock and more secure relatively easily. There are a variety of inexpensive ways to enhance your family’s chances of surviving any kind of trauma. Start by simplifying your life. If you want to be able to weather whatever comes at you and your family start by reducing the opportunities for something to actually go wrong, because you know that eventually something BIG will go wrong. Simplifying means reducing the complexity of your household, protecting your income, carefully examining your beliefs to see if they fit your current world and begin to carefully notice how you interact with those around you.

Colle Davis, Inventor, Portable Farms Aquaponics Systems holding an Asian Green Komatsuna Summerfest to show how SMALL the rootball is for the plant.

Make a list of what you want to accomplish in the next six months to help your family through any emergency. This may mean storing a few days’ supply of water, emergency food, some flashlight batteries as well as some plans for charging your mobile phone and laptop. These steps are really simple, consisting of low cost items that, if you are truly serious, you will rotate out with fresh supplies on at least an annual basis.

One other item you may want to consider for long term security is building a Portable Farms® Aquaponics System at your location. At least you can eat and if you have a small solar installation you can eat for many, many years to come. The Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems actually deliver a slight excess of everything the plants need, even the light, so every plant always have the perfect conditions for maximum growth. The NEW Enhanced PFAS also has other advantages:

  • No pesticides are ever used
  • Less water use than any other type of commercial growing system available today
  • The waste water is a valuable fertilizer that can be used on other crops or sold at a profit
  • Waist high work area
  • No single point of failure
  • No weeding – ever
  • Watering is automatic
  • No soil or dirt inside the building

For maximum production/yield, PFAS LLC recommends the following ENHANCEMENTS to a regular PFAS installation:

  • The addition of micro-nutrients that include  iron, magnesium, calcium and potassium and 53 other vital minerals are supplied with organic FF-Mineral Rock Dust
  • High performance greenhouse coverings that protect from weather extremes.
  • Insulation of all walls and roof that do not contribute direct sunlight to the grow trays
  • Grow lights capable of providing maximum full spectrum lighting for both greens and blooming plants.
  • Inert growing medium for planting seeds
  • Trellis installation for maximum vertical growing for blooming plants
  • Full monitoring system of all functions within the building that notify operator of any necessary adjustments required
  • Low cost fish tank heaters
  • Automatic water leveling system for fish tanks.

These controlled-environments-precision-growing-systems are capital intensive on the front end, but they produce income very quickly and continue to produce income over long periods of time with only operational expenses needing to be covered. The ROI on the Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems is only three to five years. Investors really appreciate these advantages and the new ‘farmers’ appreciate the opportunity to reap huge rewards for their efforts.


 

 

Origins of Aquaponics

Origins of Aquaponics
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis

WATERBLUEFISH2Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems are easier and more productive than dirt gardening or traditional agriculture and uses less water, less electricity and less labor than any other aquaponics system in the world.

Please note that aquaponics does not grow ‘field crops’ such as rice, wheat, corn or root vegetables, but it DOES grow table greens and many blooming plants (not all, but some) such as tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and beans.

The Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems duplicate what nature has been doing for billions of years. The water, containing the fish waste, is pumped out of the fish tanks to a settling tank, where the solids settle to the bottom of the tank while the nutrient-rich water then flows, by gravity, through a series of trays where the plants are growing, and then back into the fish tanks. The small amount of separated fish-waste water in the settling tank is drained off at regular intervals, and can be used to fertilize crops such as trees, ornamentals or lawns. The cycle of the water flowing through the system repeats itself several times each day. Some make-up water has to be added at regular intervals to compensate for the water used in the settling tank cleaning, and for the water used by the plants for growth (transpiration). And, that’s how the system works. Simple, elegant and with very little energy to produce high quantities of locally grown food.

Aquaponics has been explored for several decades as a possible solution to the foregoing environmental, energy and food shortage problems.  Aquaponics combines the art of growing aquatic animals (fish), known as aquaculture, with the modern technology of hydroponics in which plants are grown without soil. In aquaponics, fish and plants are grown together in an integrated closed loop re-circulating system with a very low rate of water usage or water loss due to evaporation. This symbiotic relationship between the fish and the growing plants is the goal of aquaponics by creating a sustainable ecosystem in which both fish and plants can thrive and as a result, produces safe, fresh protein and healthy vegetables.

To work efficiently, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems require ‘warm water, fresh water fish’ of some kind to provide the essential waste and their nutrients for your plants. Generally, aquaponics systems use warm-water fish instead of cold-water fish (like trout) because the plants don’t like the cold water.

Aquaponics is the growing of fish, or other water-based animals, along with land plants in a controlled environment, to maximize the use of the energy and nutrients in the system in order to harvest the greatest amount of vegetables and fish protein from the system.

The word aquaponics comes from words aquaculture, which is the cultivation of fish or other `water- based animals, and the word hydroponics, where plants are grown in a sterile medium or completely in water.

By combining the fish, water and plants, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems use an integrated environment to produce vegetables and fish in very small space, with very little water.

Aquaponics has its roots in ancient China and parts of the aquaponics system were developed in other areas of the world where high concentrations of people lived who were observant of the relationships that existed naturally in their environment.

 

 

In China, farmers knew that land livestock waste could be added to their fields or ponds to increase production of vegetables and fruit bearing plants. They also noticed that different fish had different tolerances to the level of land-animal waste in their water. For example too much pig or chicken waste caused many fish to die (the modern explanation for this is lack of oxygen) so they were careful about balancing their system for maximum yield and minimum fish loss.These Chinese farmers were able to refine their systems so they could grow chickens in pens above pigs, (with the waste dropping through along with any spilled food) who were in a pen over a pond with carp in it, and then the water flowed to another pond with other less tolerant fish such as catfish, and perhaps other aquatic animals and certainly other water plants were grown and harvested. These systems were so called flow-through systems, meaning that water was used once through the ponds, and then released to the local paddies, streams, lakes or ocean. The sludge from the bottom of the ponds was used on the fields and some of the water was used in the paddies for fertilizer before it was released.

dry-riverbedIn the twenty-first century, the world faces an environmental crisis, issues related to climate change (drought and flooding as well as record-setting heat waves) and an energy crisis. In addition, many parts of the world face severe food shortages. Twentieth century agricultural techniques have harmed the environment and consume an inordinate amount of energy and water. Many countries lack the large amounts of arable land and water needed to sustain growing human populations. Developed nations use large amounts of pesticides and artificial fertilizers to grow their grains, fruits, and vegetables. At the same time, they use huge amounts of gasoline and diesel fuel to power their farm machinery, large amounts of electricity to process their food, and enormous amounts of fuel to deliver the processed food to grocery stores. The raising of farm animals, particularly cattle and swine, is notoriously inefficient in terms of the amount of land and energy required to raise corn and other animal feed for each pound of protein produced.

Many areas of the world, such as California, require elaborate and expensive aqueducts and irrigation systems to deliver potable water to farming regions. A tremendous amount of fresh water evaporates or is otherwise wasted with conventional farming methods. Third world countries often lack the financial resources, arable land and technology to produce sufficient food, and in particular enough protein to maintain the health of their human populations. There are also health concerns raised by humans consuming pesticide residues on fruits and vegetables and hormones in chicken, pork and beef. Wild birds and animals are adversely affected by pesticide and fertilizer. Local waters (ponds, rivers, and streams) are also polluted by the runoff from the pesticides and fertilizers used for local growing.

Therefore, there is a need to promote a new “green” method of farming around the world for ‘locally grown food’ in any region to produce healthier food that requires far less land and water, and at the same time, is environmentally friendly:

•             Eliminates the need or use of artificial chemicals

•             Provides sustainability for people locally

•             Substantially reduces energy consumption for planting, harvesting and shipping food, and greenhouse gas emissions.

•             Also, provides jobs for local people strengthening the local economy.

farmnewsletter aquaponicsAquaponics has been explored for several decades as a possible solution to the foregoing environmental, energy and food shortage problems.  Aquaponics combines the art of growing aquatic animals (fish), known as aquaculture, with the modern technology of hydroponics in which plants are grown without soil. In aquaponics, fish and plants are grown together in an integrated closed loop re-circulating system with a very low rate of water usage or water loss due to evaporation. The fish waste (effluent) produced by the fish is delivered from the fish tank to a settling tank to remove the heavy ‘waste’ and then sent to the grow trays to provide a food source for growing plants in the gravel and the plants provide a natural filter for the water that keeps the fish healthy. This symbiotic relationship between the fish and the growing plants is the goal of aquaponics by creating a sustainable ecosystem in which both fish and plants can thrive and as a result, produces safe, fresh protein and healthy vegetables.

Aquaponics systems heretofore developed have not met with widespread success. Previously, aquaponics systems have been complex and labor intensive to operate, difficult to construct because to date, there has been no standard design that has proven itself to be easy to operate, and they are often poorly constructed with inferior materials requiring constant attention to leaks, challenges for disposal of the fish waste, and careful maintenance of pH levels, micronutrient depletion and water temperature. They have also been expensive in terms of the pumps and other electrical equipment required. In addition, prior aquaponics systems have been difficult to maintain and are prone to catastrophic system failures such as death of the fish and plants due to design flaws in the actual aquaponics system.

PFAS LLC and Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems have evaluated and resolved the major stumbling blocks (mentioned above) to such a degree that they can be successfully operated by semi-skilled labor to produce healthy vegetables and fish to sustain families, communities and countries.

 

Vertical Growing in Aquaponics

Vertical Growing in Aquaponics
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis

TRELLIS ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS AT BOTTOM OF THIS ARTICLE.

Every inch of space in an aquaponics tray is high value ‘real estate’ for growing food. Unlike ‘dirt gardens,’ there’s no room for plants to spread their luscious leaves, vines and blossoms across a large area as they mature to produce food.

 

Tomatoes growing vertically on clothes line ropes attached to trellis'.

Tomatoes growing vertically on clothes line ropes attached to trellis’.

The rule of thumb (make that a GREEN thumb) is for food to grow as quickly as possible. In other words: Plant it, grow it, harvest it and then repeat the process immediately by planting a new plant that was grown from seed (over a few days) on the SAME DAY the previous plant was harvested, so there is always a continuous cycle of production, and there are always plants in various stages of growth within the farm.

 

 

 

Trellis system in a Portable Farm

The two years PFAS LLC spent in our Research Center in the Tropics highlighted the problems created from the constant heat and high humidity which forced us to find solutions to this ongoing problems for creating ample air flow, suspension of the plants for vertical growing and allowing for adequate sunshine within the greenhouse. By continual experimentation with locally available materials, we invented a simple trellis system using chicken wire (made of wire or plastic) with 2″ openings and clothes-line rope which solved all our problems. It was very inexpensive and easy to install. THE PLANTS LOVED IT. Their blossoms stayed dry. The new system took the pressure of the stems and vines and allowed for sunshine to reach all parts of the plant and happily, our production soared. When the plants were small, they did require a minimal amount of tying (to the clothes line rope) and then they did the rest on their own! Some of the larger stems require us to delicately thread them through the chicken wire so they would grow naturally.

After 30 days of plant growth (green beans) with the Portable Farms Trellis’ System

After 45 days of plant growth (green beans) with a Portable Farms Trellis.

Two frames containing plastic chicken wire suspeded above grow trays to support growing blooming plants.

Tie soft clothes line rope on top wire from top tray to support growing plants for vertical growing.

The Portable Farms tropical trellis system is yours to copy, modify and use in your own backyard ‘dirt farm,’ your backyard aquaponics system or your commercial aquaponics installation. It’s our gift to you. Now go grow food and send us pictures.

Steam Powered Aquaponics (UGLY)

UGLY . . . BUT IT IS POSSIBLE: Steam Powered Aquaponics
–  By Colle and Phyllis Davis

Few people will EVER TRY Steam Powered Aquaponics, but IT IS POSSIBLE! YES, IT’S ALSO UGLY but it is possible. 

It is the awareness of the possibility that eventually moves us to make our lives more of what we want and less of the fear and insecurity that the media preaches.

Wrap your mind around this scenario: A heavily insulated building in the northern climes where there is plenty of wood to burn nearby. Basements are ideal. The building is equipped with grow lights and has an aquaponics system in place. Now the best part. No sun is necessary, no grid is necessary and no wind is necessary. Got it? How is that possible?The entire system consists of a wood fired boiler, a steam powered generator, a battery pack and voilà, steam powered aquaponics! The new level of security available to those in cold climates who have wood to burn and at least one neighbor they trust. More on this below.

Growing up in a cold climate and living in a house heated only with wood for many years gave me a deep understanding of the power of wood. Today the technology to convert wood to electricity is available, inexpensive and safe for home use. The trick is to size the components to the expected demand of the household and the aquaponics system.

Guidelines: The entire ‘load’ of the home during the daylight hours, plus the grow lights load, again this is daylight time, plus the tiny load required by the Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems. (Helpful hint here, the entire load for a single PFAS Module that can feed 8 people is an 18 watt small air pump that runs 24 hours a day and a 35 watt air pump that runs one to four hours per day.) Add up the figures and then size the battery pack to carry the house for two days.

Some of the most advanced systems are continuous feed and require only occasional attention. Some systems on YouTube are scary and dangerous

Some of the most advanced systems are continuous feed and require only occasional attention. Some systems on YouTube are scary and dangerous.

The more advanced and safe the system the easier it is to use and the more expensive it becomes. Choose wisely and live.

One of the most fascinating advantages of the steam powered aquaponics is you can go away for the weekend and not worry about it. The lights are on a timer and the main pump is on a timer, plus both can be 12volt components. Imagine the excitement of getting a trusted neighbor to stoke up the wood power every other day for an hour or so and to feed your fish so you can take a two-week vacation! That’s even better than solar powered aquaponics because your neighbor HAS to show up or they don’t get any veggies. LOL

Now the downside: You have the time, effort and energy required to build the system, then the cutting, hauling, splitting and storing the wood and convincing the spouse that your idea will actually work. The order presented here is probably backwards, but these all can be considered a downside at some level.

The upside: The most fantastic, unending array of locally grown, pesticide free food near your kitchen! The joy of knowing that no matter what happens, you will be warm, fed and can weather any storm. Very few people will indulge themselves in steam powered aquaponics, but lots of people will dream about it and how it COULD impact their lives.

 

 

 


Basil – A High-Value Crop for Aquaponics

Basil – A High-Value Crop for Aquaponics
 by Colle and Phyllis Davis

Phyllis Davis harvesting fresh delicious basil from Portable Farms Aquaponics System.

Basil is enjoyed as a fresh-leaf herb on meats and vegetables, prepared in sauces such as pesto, or dried and used in many recipes in cultures throughout the world. Basil grows well in aquaponics systems because of the ideal growing conditions created with warm water and ample sunlight.

When basil is grown in traditional in-ground growing, it is a ‘summer crop,’ but when grown year round in aquaponics systems, it is considered a ‘high value crop,’ especially when sold locally in cold climates when basil would normally be normally be considered ‘out of season.’

 

Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems are ideal for growing green leafy herbs and vegetables because:

  • The normal pH of the water in Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems ranges from 6.5 to 7.2 for ideal growing.

  • Basil enjoys a very wide pH range between 5.1 (strongly acidic) and 8.5 (alkaline) with a preferred range of 5.5 (strongly acidic) to 6.5 (mildly acidic).

  • The roots of herbs enjoy being well-drained between watering cycles.

  • Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems allow for full sun or the option of grow lights so herbs and vegetables can be grown year round which is ‘out of season’ in many areas and owners may collect top dollar for crops from local customers.

  • Basil seeds grow well in rockwool or Oasis Horticubes.

  • Basil plants may be placed on 8 inch centers and planted off-set in each row within a grow tray allowing for ample room for lush growth for each plant.

  • The root systems for basil do not spread out and are not complex root systems which makes for consistent and easy water flow throughout the grow bed during watering cycles.

  • The basil plant usually grows to a height of 18 to 24 inches and produces many offshoots for harvest per plant.

    You can cut back basil two-thirds of the entire basil plant twice before replanting the basil to begin the process again. This extends the harvest of the basil leaves and provides more cash-value crops instead of a one-time ‘grow and harvest cycle’ like lettuce. Basil can also be raised in batches and sold to customers as entire plants.

  • Since one plant will produce for four months (after a two-month initial growth), you would only replant new basil plants every six months and be continually harvesting during each four-month harvest cycle.

  • Each 40′ tray will grow 450 basil plants (on 8″ centers) which allows for 900 basil plants per year grown in a single tray. These 900 plants allow two cuttings each which can be sold to local consumers at wholesale or retail prices in your area.

Bonus – Pesto Recipe We Use When We Harvest our own Fresh Basil

We cannot count times the many times that we’ve invited friends to sit with us to enjoy an entire meal of fresh pesto sauce made from our own basil that was spread thick on hot homemade whole-wheat bread and served with sliced, freshly-harvested tomatoes from our own vines in our Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems. It’s a real pleasure to share healthy and simple food with friends. This is our definition of ‘the good life.’

Portable Farms® Pesto Sauce – Fresh off the Vine

This recipe makes about 2 cups. If you plan to freeze the excess pesto, avoid adding the crushed garlic to the recipe and wait to add it until you thaw and serve the pesto because the garlic can taste bitter after freezing.

Ingredients List:

  • 8 cups fresh basil leaves, torn off vine (discard the stem/vine)

  • 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese from a deli or fine store (don’t use the powdered Parmesan you shake out a canister for pasta)

  • 3 cups of pine nuts – slightly oiled and then toasted brown in an oven for 20 or 25 minutes

  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed

  • ¾ to 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil (depending on how thick you like your pesto sauce)

    1 teaspoon sea salt

  • ½ teaspoon fresh black pepper

Directions:

  • Place basil, ½ of oil, cheese, pine nuts, and garlic in a food processor. Pulse several times, until well chopped.

  • With machine running, quickly add olive oil in a steady stream, allowing pesto to mix blend and become cohesive but don’t over blend. Process until desired consistency is reached, season with salt and pepper, and serve.

SUMMER IS COMING – Install your Shade Cloth Above Your Grow Tables TODAY

SUMMER IS COMING – Install your Shade Cloth Above Your Grow Tables TODAY
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis

Note shade cloth mounted on the roof and sides of this greenhouse to protect the plants that will be planted in the gravel grow trays.

Note shade cloth mounted on the roof and sides of this greenhouse.

Plants can only utilize approximately 70% of direct sunlight. On the inside of a greenhouse, the temperature will rise very quickly as the sun climbs up into the sky. All greenhouses exhibit this rapid rise in temperature as the angle of the sun decreases. Even in very cold climates, the sun, on a clear day, can drive the temperatures from below freezing to the mid-60’s (15 to 20°C) very quickly. It most greenhouses, the problem is what to do with the heat and how to best utilize it for the good of the plants. Greenhouses are much easier to heat than to cool because the sun is the driving factor with the heat and that is tougher to regulate.

Shade cloth comes is a wide variety of blocking levels.

In installations using elevated medium (gravel in Portable Farms®) filled grow trays, the medium can very quickly heat up to killer temperatures for the plants if not protected from the direct rays of the sun. The advantages of the waist high gravel filled grow trays has to be tempered with the need to keep the gravel relatively cool. In raft systems, this problem is much less important because the light-colored ‘raft’ material does not heat up nearly as much as dark gravel.

Plants growing in a gravel medium in a Grow Tray in a Portable Farm.

Plants growing in a gravel medium in a Grow Tray in a Portable Farm.

Small plants growing in soil do not have much of a problem in full sunlight. The ground absorbs the heat and either passes it back to the air quickly or absorbs it lower into the soil itself. Even the lightest mulch will keep the soil cooler. With the use of gravel, the heat is absorbed and held in the top layer of unprotected gravel and this thin layer continues to heat up to over 140° F on a hot day. The seedlings will start to die if the gravel temperature exceeds 110° F for more than a few minutes.

This seedling stage of growth is the time the shade cloth is the most important in preventing the gravel from heating up faster than the air above it can remove that heat.

Aquaponics Uses 90 to 95% LESS WATER than Traditional Agriculture.

Aquaponics Uses 90 to 95% LESS WATER than Traditional Agriculture.
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis
As global warming, the price of gas, drought conditions and desertification continue to impact agriculture, the world is aggressively looking for new ways to grow food locally, using less water than is required by traditional agricultural methods. 75% of available water is used in agriculture and that potable water is becoming scarce – on  a global scale.

Being protective and adopting an attitude of sustainability is key to the future for a prosperous and healthy world. The earth has 7.4 billion inhabitants  The United Nations estimates it will further increase to 11.2 billion in the year 2100.

Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems require 95% LESS water than in-ground growing. PLUS, they produce the ready availability of a protein source though the growing of fish. Dr. Latham, Director of the Program in International Nutrition at Cornell University claims that malnutrition is a frequent cause of death and disease in third world countries. Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) affects 500 million people and kills 10 million annually.

Image result for world drought map

This map shows the results of computer models that have
projected the risk of drought for the years 2030 to 2039. 

This saltwater-cooled greenhouse grows crops in the Sahara are an example of using the most abundant natural resources available to make a new kind of farming possible. Read that sentence again, the key word is at the end, possible.

The cost of the installation was so high that the investment will never be recouped and the system will probably never be duplicated. It is another example of a solution in search of a problem where the solution is so expensive that it will not impact the problem in any meaningful way.

biblettuce1

 

 

But affordable food can be grown YEAR ROUND in aquaponics systems in the deserts, mountains, urban areas, warehouses or backyards! Building a modern climatically adapted structure containing modern aquaponics systems placed near high-end restaurants, casinos, resort hotels and other markets which demand the finest foods, results in a very attractive ROI. Add to that the initial PR buzz and the attraction of more investors being drawn into the space where they can take advantage of the new technology. Every installation has to be tailored to the area it will be build in order to be designed and built to leverage the advantage of the location.

 

 

 

greenhouse4The desert is also one of the best places to collect and use solar energy to power plant and fish growing systems. The time of day when the highest utilization takes place in an aquaponics system is during the day when the sun in nearly always bring and shiny. The demand for energy drops off before sunset and drops to a minimum requirement during the night hours.

If you live in a desert climate or almost anywhere there is adequate sunlight most of the time then a Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems installed in a climatically adapted structure will make your life much safer, more secure and you will have the best food in the world at your fingertips.

Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems  Are the Most 
Productive and Reliable Aquaponics Systems in the World

  • Portable Farms® grow food in greenhouses, warehouses or underground structures.

  • Without the use of any pesticides, harsh chemicals, antibiotics or hormones. 

  • Portable Farms® use 95% less water than traditional agricultural methods.

  • Portable Farms® use less electrical power than any other aquaponics system in the world and can be solar or wind powered.

  • Portable Farms® provide table vegetables (greens and blooming plants such as tomatoes, peppers, etc.) and fish (tilapia) as a protein source to maintain optimal health.

  • Three people can operate one-quarter of an acre of Portable Farms® which feeds 240 people forever. Twelve people can operate one acre of Portable Farms® which feeds 1,000 people forever.

  • Portable Farms® can be operated by semi-skilled labor and people of almost any age (young and old).

  • Greens grown in Portable Farms® can be harvested in as few as 28 days after installation and continue producing forever .

  • Portable Farms® feed families, communities, cities, countries and the world.

Aquaponics Training Curriculum for Portable Farms®

Aquaponics Training Curriculum for Portable Farms® Course©

CLICK HERE TO ENROLL TODAY FOR OUR NEW LOWER PRICE!


 

  • inda grow interior3Portable Farms® grow food in greenhouses, warehouses or underground structures
  • Without the use of any pesticides, harsh chemicals, antibiotics or hormones
  • Portable Farms® use 95% less water than traditional agricultural methods
  • Portable Farms® use less electrical power than any other aquaponics system in the world and can be solar or wind powered
  • Portable Farms® provide table vegetables (greens and blooming plants such as tomatoes, peppers, etc.) and fish (tilapia) as a protein source to maintain optimal health
  • Three people can operate one-quarter of an acre of Portable Farms® which feeds 240 people forever. Twelve people can operate one acre of Portable Farms® which feeds 1,000 people forever
  • Portable Farms® can be operated by semi-skilled labor and people of almost any age (young and old)
  • Greens grown in Portable Farms® can be harvested in as few as 28 days after installation and continue producing forever
  • Portable Farms® feed families, communities, cities, countries and the world.

Our 45 years of experience in aquaponics is now available to teach you how to feed your family FOREVER. [Read our History: CLICK HERE]

 


It only takes a few days to learn the areas related to assembling an aquaponics system  so you can build your own Portable Farms® Aquaponics System! Aquaponics is easier and more productive than organic gardening or traditional agriculture and uses 95% less water. Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems also use less electricity and less labor than any other aquaponics system in the world.

Below is an outline of the 26 sections (A-Z) included in the Portable Farms® Aquaponics System Course© designed for training people to assemble, operate and raise healthy organic vegetables and aquatic animals (fish) in the Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems through Aquaponics University, a wholly-owned training division of PFAS LLC.


 

farm 8 18 2012Section A: Preface to coursework and overview with images for main components of the aquaponics system

  • Easy formulation for sizing needs based on number of people the aquaponics system will feed.
  • Calculation for determining the size required for the fish tank.
  • Grow lights for structures, locations or areas with limited available sunlight.
  • Overview for an acclimatized greenhouse structure for year-round growing in an aquaponics system.

 

Phyllis Davis, Co-Inventor, Harvesting fresh greens from their Portable Farms.

Phyllis Davis, Co-Inventor, Harvesting fresh greens from their Portable Farms.

Section B: Overview and images of the interior of aquaponics system

  • Explanation of the components that are incorporated into the aquaponics system for easy care.
  • Ratios for grow space vs gallons of water required for an efficient aquaponics system.
  • Recommendations for sunscreen protection for interior of structure (greenhouse).
  • Determination for required feet ‘head room’ above grow trays for maximum plant production.

 

Section C: Terms and definition regarding the aquaponics system

  • Terms and their definition that are used in the coursework, assembly and operations.

 

Section D: Site requirements for the aquaponics system

  • Considerations prior to the installation of the structure (greenhouse).
  • Suggestions for basic requirements regarding installation of grow trays, air flow within the structure and alternative energy.

 

portable-farms-broccoli-blooming-plants-in-aquaponics

 

Section E: Materials lists and cost estimates for assembly of the aquaponics system

  • Materials lists and US prices (approximate) for lumber, fish tank, fish and other pertinent supplies and materials.
  • Suggestions regarding the purchase of a breeding colony for aquaponics.

 

 

Section F: Assembly of clarifier (settling tank) as component of the aquaponics system

  • Explanation and basic operation of clarifier.
  • Location, requirements, drum, PVC fittings,  and proper plumbing of clarifier.

 

portable-farms-tilapia1Section G – Fish tanks and introducing the fish into the fish tank in the aquaponics system

  • The formula for the volume (size) of the fish tank.
  • Fish recommendation.
  • Recommended maximum loading capacity of the fish in relation to the size of the grow tray.
  • Water temperature maintenance and insulation designs for maintaining recommended narrow temperature range for maximum fish health.
  • Building a tank to protect the fish and maintain temperature range.

 

gtt 40 days with colle3Section H: Assembly of grow tray tables in the aquaponics system

  • Directions for building and waterproofing methods for grow tray.
  • Examples for assembly of sturdy legs to support the weight of the grow tray.
  • Plumbing the grow tray for effective water flow to feed and water plants.
  • Effectively installing medium into grow tray.

 

 

Section I: Explanation of required necessary electrical components in the aquaponics system

  • List of electrical components, their function and installation

 

portable-farms-grow-trays-constructionSection J: Calibrated Air Displacement (CAD) pump in the aquaponics system

  • Explanation, images and installation of the CAD pump.

 

Section K: Plumbing the aquaponics system for water flow in the aquaponics system

  • Instructions for connecting all the basic elements of the system together with PVC pipe.

Section L: Conclusion to assembly section for the aquaponics system

 

Section M: Basic operations of the aquaponics system

  • Information overview regarding the yields, care of plants and fish and the water in their tanks.

 

Oreochromis mossambicusSection N: The fish and the support of their health and growth in the aquaponics system

  • Reasons for use of a variety of all-male fish in aquaponics.
  • Feeding and care of the fish in the tanks.
  • Restocking fish after harvest.
  • Discussion for use of duck weed and suggestions and resources for raising duck weed for feeding fish.

 

 

Note shade cloth mounted on the roof and sides of this greenhouse to protect the plants that will be planted in the gravel grow trays.

Note shade cloth mounted on the roof and sides of this greenhouse to protect the plants that will be planted in the gravel grow trays.

Section O: Pumps in the aquaponics system

  • Overview and installation of pumps for moving water through the system. 

 

Section P: Climate and weather specific operations and emergency solutions (due to power failure) in the aquaponics system.

  • Operating the system during normal weather conditions, hot conditions, cool or cold conditions and during emergency situations (power outages).

 

Section Q: The operations and cleaning of the clarifier in the aquaponics system

  • Directions for routine cleaning and disposal of the fish waste.
  • Maintenance of the clarifier for keeping the fish healthy and the plants happy and well fed.

 

Section R: The grow tray table and your plants in the aquaponics system

  • Vertical growing and trellis design features in the grow tray for maximum support of the growth of tall green plants or blooming plants.
  • Safety and hygiene issues for aquaponics that are vital to health of fish and plants.
  • Plant and harvest suggestions for maintaining optimal growth in the grow tray.
  • Care and cleaning of the areas around the grow trays to maintain as clean an interior structure as possible for maximum healthy, safety and productivity of both plants and fish.

 

Komatsuna summerfest - An Asian Green we prefer over bib lettuce.

Komatsuna summerfest – An Asian Green we prefer over bib lettuce.

Section S: Seed planting and harvesting in the aquaponics system

  • Use of mineral rock dust when planting and growing all plants to support maximum growth.
  • Suggestions for organic growing mediums for planting seeds.
  • Seed and variety suggestions for growing greens and blooming plants.
  • Planting and caring for plants in the grow tray.
  • Indoor pollination suggestions.

 

Section T: The physical structure for the aquaponics system

  • Recommendation for a greenhouse cover that offers 83% diffusion for scattering light within interior of structure.
  • Sun shade for interior of structure.
  • Advantages for greenhouse structure
  • What NOT to do regarding physical structure.

 

tilapia drawingSection U: Fish harvesting and restocking methods in the aquaponics system

  • Recommendations for harvesting only the fish in the tank that are harvest size.
  • Suggestions for creating minimal stress on the smaller fish that remain in the fish tank that were not harvested.

Section V: Fish processing and cooking freshly harvested fish in the aquaponics system

  • Humane way to fill fish.
  • Easy way to gut fish.
  • Simple way to fillet fish. 

 

table1Section W: Ongoing operations of the aquaponics system

  • Recommended daily ‘chores’ for raising plants and fish.
  • Normal maintenance issues related to the gravel, fish tanks, clarifier for maximum production.
  • Routine cleanliness-related topics for healthy food and fish.
  • Methods for monitoring plants to assure no insects impact food within the structure.

 

 

Section X: Food safety and technology on-farm food safety in the aquaponics system

  • Good food practices on aquaponics farm offered by a major US university related to the following basic sanitation procedures to significantly minimize risks.
  • Key areas of food safety considerations in aquaponics include human sanitation, harvesting produce safely, managing warm-blooded animal feces, water sources for fish and produce, zoonoses prevention and disposing of the system’s waste water.

 

Phyllis Davis holding ONE HEAD of India Mustard grown in 45 in Portable Farms® Aquaponics System.

Phyllis Davis holding ONE HEAD of India Mustard grown in 45 days in Portable Farms® Aquaponics System.

Section Y: Guidelines for growing health plants and fish in the aquaponics system

  • Worm casting tea as a foliage spray for enhanced plant health
  • Smoking prohibited due to Tobacco Mosaic Virus
  • Monitoring and adjusting pH balance to assure plant health and productivity as well as fish health and safety.

 

Section Z: Recognizing pests (bugs/insects) within the aquaponics system

  • Simple organic solutions for ridding pests from the structure.
  • Recommendations for protecting structure from pests.

Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems are the most efficient commercial aquaponics systems in the world.

We accept MasterCard, Visa, PayPal and Wire Transfers. If you’d prefer, you may call us to give us your credit number over the phone: 800-906-0256 OR 800-952-6224. We also accept checks and money orders.

Shipping and postage are included to addresses in the US only, BUT for all order outside the US there is a US$140 shipping and handling charge.

Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems GROW FOOD.

View a  2 minute video clip of the interior of 16 x 33′ Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems. TheYouTube video has been viewed over 56,100 times.

Aquaponics University (AU) offers an easy-to-understand home-study course that teaches individuals how to grow chemical-free food and fish in a closed-loop system.

Aquaponics University (AU) offers our own Portable Farms® Aquaponics System Course© that teaches individuals how to grow chemical-free food and fish in a closed-loop system.

REFUND POLICY: Please note. You may ask for and receive a full refund of your tuition you begin the course  because you will have access to the entire course curriculum.  At the point, there will be no refund because you have received access to all our Intellectual Property.


Basic Grow Tables Sizes for an Aquaponics System


Basic Grow Tables Sizes for an Aquaponics System

– By Colle and Phyllis Davis

READ THE ENTIRE AQUAPONICS COURSE OUTLINE: CLICK HERE.build5

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This installation includes the grow tray(s), fish tank(s) and other items necessary for your system to operate at its peak performance. The acceptable ratios of the components to each other to maximize your production and protect the system are covered in this article. Here are some parameters and ratios you will need to keep in mind when sizing and ordering materials:

  1. The maximum comfortable distance for a person to reach across at counter-height is a width of 36 inches (1m), so a grow tray with only one side exposed can only be 36 inches wide. For a grow tray with both sides facing an aisle the maximum width can be six feet (1.85m).
  2. The aisles need to be a minimum of 30 inches (.76m) for comfort and safety
  3. The grow trays are restricted to 200 sq ft due for ease of working with aisles and carrying harvested vegetables out to the building.
  4. Grow trays must be water proof and absolutely level in both directions. The most commonly built grow trays are wooden tray tables with pond liners.a savings of approximately 15 to 20% of the overall cost, but they are normally more work to build. They also have slightly lower operating expenses because they are easier to heat and cool.

 Colle Davis spreading gravel with Juan, his helper. FUN DAY!


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