NO! Aquaponics Food DOES NOT ‘Taste Fishy!’

NO! Aquaponics Food DOES NOT ‘Taste Fishy!’
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis

lanai 43 days later

Each time we are asked, “Does aquaponic’s food ‘tastes fishy?'” we are tempted to say, “Do the vegetables you buy at the supermarket, or at the farmers market taste like cow manure?”

But instead, we bite our tongue, smile and reply, “No, the food is delicious, fresh, and rich with nutrients like food is ‘supposed’ to taste.” The same logic applies to using fish waste as it does for using composted (dairy) cow manure as a soil fertilizer in ‘dirt farming’ where the manure is used to replaced depleted-soil nutrients.

The fish waste/poop contains high amounts of ammonia and other nutrients and actually doesn’t smell bad at all.

Here’s how Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems utilize fish waste to grow plants so successfully:

  • The Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems are designed to lift all of the fish waste out of the fish tank
  • The Control Panel moves the water from the fish tanks twice a day (like flushing a toilet) to an area where the solids (think ‘tiny poops’) are moved into in a ‘separate’ tank
  • After the tiny poops have been ‘flushed’ out of the fish tank, the clear water, laden with the nutrients from the fish waste (without the tiny poops), flows to the head of the Grow Tray.
  • The Grow Tray is actually HUGE bio filter and the water flows back trough the Grow Tray delivering to the plants all of the water and nutrients they need directly to their root systems, and then, the water flows back into the Fish Tank.
  • The Grow Tray bio filter is loaded with really good, hard working bacteria (which is the GOLD that makes aquaponics such a productive system) that specializes in converting nitrites (ammonia) into nitrates (plant food).
  • The surface area of the gravel has thousands of times the surface areas of the fish tank and allows the bacteria to grow uninhibited to produce their version of plant food just as they have done for about a billion years. The plants (the vegetables) are removing the nitrates and other nutrients from the water stream in the gravel to produce the best tasting, most nutritious and best looking food you can grow. PLUS the fish are receiving the water back into their fish tanks after the water has been stripped of nutrients and now it has also been heavily oxygenated. It a win:win for plants, fish and ultimately for the consumer.

The edible portions of the vegetables are never touched by the water. The plants are never watered from above the gravel in the Grow Trays so there is absolutely no chance of splashing anything up on the leaves. There is no weeding or cultivating so the plants simply sit there growing until they are ready to be harvested. They spend their entire lives in a perfect growing environment getting ready for your table.

 Would you like to learn more about aquaponics? Learn from us . . . 


Read Five New Ebooks About Aquaponics-Related Topics
Written by Colle and Phyllis Davis, Inventors, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems and Published in 2015

For more detailed information about these books: CLICK HERE.

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Commercial Aquaponics GOLD
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Listen to an important message from Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

Aquaponics GOLD

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 Listen to Phyllis Davis tell you about AQUAPONICS GOLD.

Backyard Aquaponics GOLD

cover 3

An overview for those considering the option of installing an aquaponics system near their home.

 

Greenhouse & Warehouse Aquaponics GOLDgreenhouse book cover

This ebook discloses the facts, figures and formulas necessary for successful greenhouse and warehouse aquaponics growing. 

 

 Solar Aquaponics GOLD

cover 1

Let us show you HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE and HOW MUCH it costs to install your own solar powered system for YOUR aquaponics system.

 

Growing Fruit Trees or Blueberries in Aquaponics

How to Grow Fruit Trees or Blueberries in Aquaponics 
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis
 

In answer to the many questions we receive about aquaponics, “Yes, you can use aquaponics to grow fruit trees and blueberries.” 

Growing fruit trees with aquaponics requires having patience, being willing to follow instructions and being flexible in your choice of trees, fish and output. The main difference in using aquaponics to grow ‘fruit’ trees is that the equation shifts from extremely high value real estate (areas in gravel beds is valuable space when placed inside of a climatically adapted structure) to seasonal, outdoor controlled growing. Here are the main parameters that need to be addressed when considering raising fruit trees with aquaponics. 

 

  1. Pollination. Bees do not do well at all inside buildings. Hand pollination is time consuming and expensive.
  2. Which fruit(s) should you raise?
  3. What market is being addressed and can the fruit compete with regular ‘dirt farming’ methods currently used for growing fruit?
  4. What is to be done with the fish waste water when the trees are dormant?
  5. What training will the personnel need to have in order to make the aquaponics-fruit-growing-installation most productive? 

All of these issues have to be addressed before looking at the land to be used for the orchard/vineyard for the fruit. For the moment we’ll assume that the go-ahead has been made to install an aquaponics orchard to raise apricots, a high value crop which does not ship well and is in demand in the local markets. Fruit that travel well (apples, oranges, lemons, and limes) and that can be stored for long periods are not good candidates for aquaponics because the installation costs are too high to compete with current growing methods. The other fruit this method covers well is blueberries, so you may substitute blueberries for apricots in the information below. 

The first step for installing an orchard is to dig trenches on the contour across the slope of the designated orchard area. These trenches need to be 18 to 24 inches (45cm to 60cm) deep and the same wide with a 4 to 6 inch berm build up on each side to prevent ground water from entering the trench at any time. Then an impermeable membrane is placed covering the entire berm trench berm area to insure that no water either leaves or enters the trench. (Blueberries only need half the trench size.) 

At one end of the top trench, install an automatic trip valve in a sump area and have it drain into the trench below so the water is flowing back across the slope in the next trench down the slope. This arrangement will mean the water travels from one end of the trench to the other, drops to the next level and traverses the slope in the opposite direction for each trench. The slope must be great enough for the trench to fill nearly full each time and then to drain out completely. The ideal slope is 1:6 up to 1:8, less or more slope requires some consulting time to design a functioning system.  

Before filling the lined trenches with gravel, fill them with water first to observe that each automatic trip valve is working correctly and that each trench drains completely.  

The next step is placing the gravel that has been to be washed and screened to remove sand, mud and debris into the trenches up to two inches below the top of the berm. The gravel needs to be level in all directions. Fill each trench insuring the pipe surrounding the automatic trip valve has no gravel inside of it.   

Finally make sure the last trench drains completely into the fish tank/pond. Now it is the time to plant the trees (bushes) and install the fish into their new home. The choice of fish is much broader than it is with indoor aquaponics. Local fish can be used very successfully. Feed the fish what they will eat in 15 to 30 second once or twice a day after they are two to three inches long.  

When the fruiting season is over, reduce the water flow through the system to twice a week and after the leaves drop only run the water once or twice a month to insure the trees have some water. In the spring, begin the water flow before the first thaw and before the leaves start to swell.  

Now, here is a quick and dirty method. Cut several 55-gallon plastic drums in half, install a drain line with a shut off valve in the bottom so you can control the water level, fill with gravel, plant your favorite fruit trees and water with fish waste water a couple times a week during growing season and once or twice a month when they are dormant. AQUAPONICS FRUIT GROWING:  DONE.  


Read Five New Ebooks About Aquaponics-Related Topics
Written by Colle and Phyllis Davis, Inventors, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems and Published in 2015

For more detailed information about these books: CLICK HERE.

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Commercial Aquaponics GOLD
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Listen to an important message from Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

Aquaponics GOLD

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 Listen to Phyllis Davis tell you about AQUAPONICS GOLD.

Backyard Aquaponics GOLD

cover 3

An overview for those considering the option of installing an aquaponics system near their home.

 

Greenhouse & Warehouse Aquaponics GOLDgreenhouse book cover

This ebook discloses the facts, figures and formulas necessary for successful greenhouse and warehouse aquaponics growing. 

 

 Solar Aquaponics GOLD

cover 1

Let us show you HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE and HOW MUCH it costs to install your own solar powered system for YOUR aquaponics system.

 

Basic Grow Tables Sizes for an Aquaponics System


Basic Grow Tables Sizes for an Aquaponics System

– By Colle and Phyllis Davis

READ THE ENTIRE AQUAPONICS COURSE OUTLINE: CLICK HERE.build5

table1

 

This installation includes the grow tray(s), fish tank(s) and other items necessary for your system to operate at its peak performance. The acceptable ratios of the components to each other to maximize your production and protect the system are covered in this article. Here are some parameters and ratios you will need to keep in mind when sizing and ordering materials

  1. The maximum comfortable distance for a person to reach across at counter-height is a width of 36 inches (1m), so a grow tray with only one side exposed can only be 36 inches wide. For a grow tray with both sides facing an aisle the maximum width can be six feet (1.85m).
  2. The aisles need to be a minimum of 30 inches (.76m) for comfort and safety
  3. The grow trays are restricted to 200 sq ft due for ease of working with aisles and carrying harvested vegetables out to the building.
  4. Grow trays must be water proof and absolutely level in both directions. The most commonly built grow trays are wooden tray tables with pond liners.a savings of approximately 15 to 20% of the overall cost, but they are normally more work to build. They also have slightly lower operating expenses because they are easier to heat and cool.

Read Five New Ebooks About Aquaponics-Related Topics
Written by Colle and Phyllis Davis, Inventors, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems and Published in 2015

For more detailed information about these books: CLICK HERE.

ebookdownload

Commercial Aquaponics GOLD
COVER1

 

Listen to an important message from Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

Aquaponics GOLD

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 Listen to Phyllis Davis tell you about AQUAPONICS GOLD.

Backyard Aquaponics GOLD

cover 3

An overview for those considering the option of installing an aquaponics system near their home.

 

Greenhouse & Warehouse Aquaponics GOLDgreenhouse book cover

This ebook discloses the facts, figures and formulas necessary for successful greenhouse and warehouse aquaponics growing. 

 

 Solar Aquaponics GOLD

cover 1

Let us show you HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE and HOW MUCH it costs to install your own solar powered system for YOUR aquaponics system.

 

DIY Recipe to KILL Aphids and White Flies in Aquaponics

PFAS LLC – Successfully implemented by the Inventors of Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems©  

It’s SUMMER and aphids, whiteflies and mealy bugs love to attack healthy plants.

DIY Simple Recipe and Applications Directions for Fish Friendly Insect Control Solution

Concentrated Foliar Solution for Aquaponics Systems and Outdoor Gardening

Recipe and Directions $1.99 – CLICK HERE.

dyi cover

white flyaphids              mealy bugs

      Whiteflies                             Aphids                                    Mealy bugs

.
Colle and Phyllis Davis have used this simple technique in Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems for reducing and eliminating whiteflies, aphids and mealy bugs as well as discouraging ants from the farms. While this solution will not kill ants on contact, it does discourage them from reappearing after repeated use.

 

The formula is the one we have developed and used very successfully in our own Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems and contains no neem oil or other chemicals or products that could harm the fish in our systems. The wonderfully conducive growing atmosphere in the PFAS means that insects are in heaven IF they can get inside. This formula is the only insect control we use and recommend because it does not harm fish, our nutrient supplier, in any way. We have experimented with many insect control formulas over the years including those with citric acid and other ‘natural organic products’ all of which had negative impacts on our fish.
We have also used it on our indoor houseplants as well as our regular garden and on our flowers and had great success. Recipe and Directions $1.99 – CLICK HERE.

Read Five New Ebooks About Aquaponics-Related Topics
Written by Colle and Phyllis Davis, Inventors, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems and Published in 2015

For more detailed information about these books: CLICK HERE.

ebookdownload

Commercial Aquaponics GOLD
COVER1

 

Listen to an important message from Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

Aquaponics GOLD

aquaponics gold High Resolution WEB

 Listen to Phyllis Davis tell you about AQUAPONICS GOLD.

Backyard Aquaponics GOLD

cover 3

An overview for those considering the option of installing an aquaponics system near their home.

 

Greenhouse & Warehouse Aquaponics GOLDgreenhouse book cover

This ebook discloses the facts, figures and formulas necessary for successful greenhouse and warehouse aquaponics growing. 

 

 Solar Aquaponics GOLD

cover 1

Let us show you HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE and HOW MUCH it costs to install your own solar powered system for YOUR aquaponics system.

 

Urban Farming to Feed City Folks

Urban Farming to Feed City Dwellers
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis

Commercial Aquaponics GOLD

Listen to an important message from Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

  • Commercial Aquaponics Gold (Second Edition, published September 23, 2015)
  • This comprehensive information about commercial aquaponics provides you will all the facts you’ll need to make an informed business decision about commercial aquaponics growing in controlled environment agricultural (CEA).
  • We’re also offering TWO FREE BONUSES with the purchase of Commercial Aquaponics GOLD: 1) A formal ten-step strategy business plan template designed specifically for commercial aquaponics growing to present to funders and, 2) PFAS LLC’s Executive Summary showing production and operating costs, profits and best-produce choices to achieve the shortest Return on Investment.

interior pfas 1Have you ever thought to yourself, “I’d like to start with a small aquaponics system and then grow into system to sell food to the local community?” If so, you’ll enjoy this article because it is the blueprint for growing a profitable business.

Backyard aquaponics continues a skyward trend for families interested in growing their own healthy food year round and now many of those same families are enlarging their Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems to raise enough food to share with friends or to sell to small businesses, restaurants and markets in their own communities.

Growing LOCAL food in cities IS the future of commercial urban agriculture and Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems are the ideal solutions for local urban growing because they require so little space compared to traditional methods of agriculture.

‘Locally grown’ food is nutritious and at its peak of flavor when it is harvested when it’s ripe and delivered to consumers within a day or two of harvest.

portable-farms-commercial-greenhouse-growingThe use of controlled environments (greenhouses or warehouses) in cities is an ideal way to grow enough food to feed some of those living in crowded cities. After all, it’s becoming more expensive to grow and ship food into large urban areas such as New York City, Los Angeles, London, and Tokyo, and food that has been shipped to consumers has always been harvested prior to its peak ripeness which reduces the nutritional value, the texture and flavor while extending the ‘shelf life’ of the food.

 

 

Banker having phone call outdoorsAquaponics is NOT a get rich quick scheme. It is not an angel type investment where the risk and rewards are huge.

Bottom Lines:

greenhouselong aquaponicsTo be economically viable the moment the PFAS installation becomes operation, the size needs to be in the range of 10,000 sq ft (1,000m2) or more. With the owner/investor carrying some of the labor and marketing costs the ROI becomes even more attractive. Smaller installations are certainly viable and profitable; they simply require more owner/investor time and a very different type of marketing effort.

 

  1. The markets must be local, meaning that they are less than two hours from the aquaponics’ facility. The markets (end user) must be willing to pay top wholesale money to satisfy their customers. The best markets are resort hotels, high-end restaurants, casinos, institutions that serve at least one meal every day. Your markets must be in place BEFORE you start building because the Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems grow prodigious amounts of food and begin producing food within a month to six weeks after they are operational, and the market must always demand more than the production of the unit.

greenhouse4The cost to build the first community Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems’ installation will be in the range of US$285,000 to US$350,000 depending on how well the climatically adapted building and materials for the Modules can be purchased and delivered. This number is based on slab up cost. NO LAND ACQUISITION OR PREPARATION COSTS ARE IN THAT NUMBER because it is site specific and too variable. The second and subsequent installations are at least US$20,000 less because our construction foreman is not required to be there for the additional installations. The local crews will have been trained on the first installation.

 

  1. Leased greenhouses move the capital cost to an operational cost and a MUCH better ROI. Converting an enclosed space to use for aquaponics is expensive and the lighting alone cost approximately the same on a per square foot basis as building a climatically adapted greenhouse. Unless the electrical power is very inexpensive, the cost to operate an indoor installation can be daunting and must be carefully examined.
  1. globalbusiness2Operational costs are covered in the Executive Summary and are based on California labor, feed and electrical costs. These operating expenses are often different in different parts of the world. For example, in the US, the figures are based on one and a half full time employees in the installation. In most countries in Africa you can hire 6 to 10 people for the same amount of money. Even if twice as many people are required to operate the installation, in many countries the labor costs are significantly less. The feed (fish food) cost is very similar everywhere in the world. The electrical cost varies so much that many installations have solar as their main source even if the grid is available. Having onsite power also reduces the chance of an extended power failure effecting production.
  1. Marketing, distribution and HR are NOT covered in the figures because in most cases, the owner/investor has another company that they can spread those tasks across because they are not full time positions with only one commercial installation.

Second Caveat: One or more of your people will be required to successfully complete the Aquaponics University Portable Farms Aquaponics Systems Course© before a community Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems installation is built. PFAS LLC will refund the cost of the Aquaponics University Course upon the funding of any installation containing 26 or more PFAS Modules. This small investment help insure the success of the installation.


Read Five New Ebooks About Aquaponics-Related Topics
Written by Colle and Phyllis Davis, Inventors, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems and Published in 2015

For more detailed information about these books: CLICK HERE.

ebookdownload

Commercial Aquaponics GOLD
COVER1

 

Listen to an important message from Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

Aquaponics GOLD

aquaponics gold High Resolution WEB

 Listen to Phyllis Davis tell you about AQUAPONICS GOLD.

Backyard Aquaponics GOLD

cover 3

An overview for those considering the option of installing an aquaponics system near their home.

 

Greenhouse & Warehouse Aquaponics GOLDgreenhouse book cover

This ebook discloses the facts, figures and formulas necessary for successful greenhouse and warehouse aquaponics growing. 

 

 Solar Aquaponics GOLD

cover 1

Let us show you HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE and HOW MUCH it costs to install your own solar powered system for YOUR aquaponics system.

 

Basil – A High-Value Crop for Aquaponics

Basil – A High-Value Crop for Aquaponics
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis

Phyllis Davis harvesting a dozen large basil. We're making pesto with pine nuts, fresh Parmesan cheese, garlic and olive oil and serving it with fresh hot homemade cracked-wheat bread and served with mozzarella cheese and fresh tomatoes for dinner tonight. WISH YOU WERE HERE. It's a good life. It's a simple life. It's a happy life.

Phyllis Davis harvesting a dozen large basil. We’re making pesto with pine nuts, fresh Parmesan cheese, garlic and olive oil and serving it with fresh hot homemade cracked-wheat bread and served with mozzarella cheese and fresh tomatoes for dinner tonight. WISH YOU WERE HERE.It’s a good life. It’s a simple life. It’s a happy life.

Basil is enjoyed as a fresh-leaf herb on meats and vegetables, prepared in sauces such as pesto, or dried and used in many recipes in cultures throughout the world. Basil grows well in aquaponics systems because of the ideal growing conditions created with warm water and ample sunlight.

When basil is grown in traditional in-ground growing, it is a ‘summer crop,’ but when grown year round in aquaponics systems, it is considered a ‘high value crop,’ especially when sold locally in cold climates when basil would normally be normally be considered ‘out of season.’

Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems are ideal for growing green leafy herbs and vegetables because:

  • The normal pH of the water in Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems ranges from 6.5 to 7.2 for ideal growing.

  • Basil PatioPonics Portable Farm

    32″ Basil in a Portable Farm

    Basil enjoys a very wide pH range between 5.1 (strongly acidic) and 8.5 (alkaline) with a preferred range of 5.5 (strongly acidic) to 6.5 (mildly acidic).

  • The roots of herbs enjoy being well-drained between watering cycles.

  • Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems allow for full sun or the option of grow lights so herbs and vegetables can be grown year round which is ‘out of season’ in many areas and owners may collect top dollar for crops from local customers.

  • Basil seeds grow well in rockwool or Oasis Horticubes.
  • Basil plants may be placed on 8 inch centers and planted off-set in each row within a grow tray allowing for ample room for lush growth for each plant.

  • The root systems for basil do not spread out and are not complex root systems which makes for consistent and easy water flow throughout the grow bed during watering cycles.

  • The basil plant usually grows to a height of 18 to 24 inches and produces many offshoots for harvest per plant.

  • You can cut back basil two-thirds of the entire basil plant twice before replanting the basil to begin the process again. This extends the harvest of the basil leaves and provides more cash-value crops instead of a one-time ‘grow and harvest cycle’ like lettuce. Basil can also be raised in batches and sold to customers as entire plants.

  • Since one plant will produce for four months (after a two-month initial growth), you would only replant new basil plants every six months and be continually harvesting during each four-month harvest cycle.

  • Each 40′ tray will grow 450 basil plants (on 8″ centers) which allows for 900 basil plants per year grown in a single tray. These 900 plants allow two cuttings each which can be sold to local consumers at wholesale or retail prices in your area.

Bonus – Pesto Recipe We Use When We Harvest our own Fresh Basil

We cannot count times the many times that we’ve invited friends to sit with us to enjoy an entire meal of fresh pesto sauce made from our own basil that was spread thick on hot homemade whole-wheat bread and served with sliced, freshly-harvested tomatoes from our own vines in our Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems. It’s a real pleasure to share healthy and simple food with friends. This is our definition of ‘the good life.’

Portable Farms

Portable Farms® Pesto Sauce – Fresh off the Vine

This recipe makes about 2 cups. If you plan to freeze the excess pesto, avoid adding the crushed garlic to the recipe and wait to add it until you thaw and serve the pesto because the garlic can taste bitter after freezing.

Ingredients List:

  • 8 cups fresh basil leaves, torn off vine (discard the stem/vine)

  • 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese from a deli or fine store (don’t use the powdered Parmesan you shake out a canister for pasta)

  • 3 cups of pine nuts – slightly oiled and then toasted brown in an oven for 20 or 25 minutes

  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed

  • ¾ to 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil (depending on how thick you like your pesto sauce)

  • 1 teaspoon sea salt

  • ½ teaspoon fresh black pepper

Directions:

  1. Place basil, ½ of oil, cheese, pine nuts, and garlic in a food processor. Pulse several times, until well chopped.

  2. With machine running, quickly add olive oil in a steady stream, allowing pesto to mix blend and become cohesive but don’t over blend. Process until desired consistency is reached, season with salt and pepper, and serve.


 

Read Five New Ebooks About Aquaponics-Related Topics
Written by Colle and Phyllis Davis, Inventors, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems and Published in 2015

For more detailed information about these books: CLICK HERE.

ebookdownload

Commercial Aquaponics GOLD
COVER1

 

Listen to an important message from Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

Aquaponics GOLD

aquaponics gold High Resolution WEB

 Listen to Phyllis Davis tell you about AQUAPONICS GOLD.

Backyard Aquaponics GOLD

cover 3

An overview for those considering the option of installing an aquaponics system near their home.

 

Greenhouse & Warehouse Aquaponics GOLDgreenhouse book cover

This ebook discloses the facts, figures and formulas necessary for successful greenhouse and warehouse aquaponics growing. 

 

 Solar Aquaponics GOLD

cover 1

Let us show you HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE and HOW MUCH it costs to install your own solar powered system for YOUR aquaponics system.

 

Smokers Trasmit Virus in Portable Farms

Tobacco Mosaic Virus
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis

Tomato mosaic virus cause yellowing and stunting of tomato plants and cuts yield production.

tobacco virus leaf

The effects of tobacco mosaic virus on a tomato plant.

Tobacco Mosaic Virus

Tobacco Mosaic Virus

NO SMOKING ALLOWED IN THE GREENHOUSE.

AND NO SMOKERS ALLOWED IN THE GREENHOUSE WHO HAVE BEEN SMOKING OUTSIDE THE GREENHOUSE.

NO E-CIGS OR E-CIG SMOKERS ARE ALLOWED IN THE GREENHOUSE. Anyway you cut it, tobacco is tobacco.

All forms of tobacco, smoke, vapor or nicotine will cause Tobacco Mosaic Virus, Cucumber Mosaic Virus and other blooming plant viruses. 

No marijuana smoking or marijuana smokers should be allowed in the greenhouse.

Smokeless tobacco (chewing tobacco, dip, snuff, pouches) can also carry the tobacco mosaic virus and is transmitted by human hands to the plant material.

Since you cannot use any type of insecticide in an aquaponics system (or you’ll kill the fish), you must protect your plants and fish from toxins, pathogens, and insects.

We recommend that anyone who touches the gravel or the plants wear clean disposable gloves, every time they work in the farm. We also recommend that NO TOBACCO USERS, NO SMOKING AND NO SMOKERS ever be allowed to handle the gravel or handle the plants (with our without gloves) for fear of introducing the tobacco mosaic virus into the farm. We also recommend all plants are grown from seed because small plants brought in from nurseries hold a high possibility for having been handled by smokers and may also contain aphids and other pests.

This Tobacco Mosaic Virus attacks tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers and produces
bumps on the leaves, uneven coloring and stunted and distorted fruit.

VISIT AQUAPONICS UNIVERSITY AND LEARN ABOUT AQUAPONICS! 


Read Five New Ebooks About Aquaponics-Related Topics
Written by Colle and Phyllis Davis, Inventors, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems and Published in 2015

For more detailed information about these books: CLICK HERE.

ebookdownload

Commercial Aquaponics GOLD
COVER1

 

Listen to an important message from Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

Aquaponics GOLD

aquaponics gold High Resolution WEB

 Listen to Phyllis Davis tell you about AQUAPONICS GOLD.

Backyard Aquaponics GOLD

cover 3

An overview for those considering the option of installing an aquaponics system near their home.

 

Greenhouse & Warehouse Aquaponics GOLDgreenhouse book cover

This ebook discloses the facts, figures and formulas necessary for successful greenhouse and warehouse aquaponics growing. 

 

 Solar Aquaponics GOLD

cover 1

Let us show you HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE and HOW MUCH it costs to install your own solar powered system for YOUR aquaponics system.

 

Pesticide & GMO Free Food is Rare and Precious

Pesticide & GMO Free Food is Rare and Precious
– by Colle and Phyllis Davis

stop gmo hands 2It’s a sad sad sad fact that avoiding Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) is difficult when shopping for food today for breads and cereals. There is an enormous fight now to insist that food companies label their food as containing GMO. The (stupid) argument claims that if people are told that a food product contains GMO, they will consider that product inferior and sales will suffer. To date, more than $70 million has been spent JUST in California and Washington to defeat the premise that labels should contain GMO labeling because there is not enough proof that GMO harms human health.

Oh please . . . wake up folks.

Twentieth century agricultural techniques have harmed the environment and consume an inordinate amount of energy and water. Many countries lack the large amounts of arable land and water needed to sustain their growing human populations. Developing nations use large amounts of pesticides and artificial fertilizers to grow their grains, fruits, and vegetables. At the same time, they use huge amounts of gasoline, natural gas and diesel fuel to power their farm machinery, produce electricity to process their food, and enormous amounts of fuel to ship the processed food to grocery stores. The raising of farm animals, particularly cattle and swine, is notoriously inefficient in terms of the amount of land and energy required to raise corn and other animal feed for each pound of protein produced.

With increasingly volatile weather conditions, bigger storms, heavier rains, and more intense droughts, aquaponics offers easy solutions that outweigh issues related to traditional agriculture. Climate change effects not just food prices, but also food availability.

PLEASE NOTE: GMO seeds are commonly used in field crops like corn and wheat but will KILL broad leaf vegetables like tomatoes and lettuces. There are many misconceptions about GMO seeds used in planting typical vegetable gardens and Portable Farms® uses NO GMO seeds in our aquaponics systems. GMO seeds are commonly used in the crops corn, wheat, soy, cotton, sugar, zucchini, squash, papaya, aspartame, and milk products. Here is a list of products containing GMO (scary list – we have always loved Thomas English Muffins, but no more).

What are GMOs, anyway? “Genetically modified organisms are created by deliberately changing the genetic makeup of a plant or animal in ways that could never occur in nature. The majority of GMO crops currently on the market have been genetically engineered to produce their own pesticides and/or withstand herbicides that normally would kill them. Farmers use the herbicides to control weeds.”- Consumer Reports, Where GMOs hide in your food – New Consumer Reports’ tests find genetically modified organisms

pesticidefreezoneNow the real world enters the picture. The number one request from concerned foodies is for ‘locally grown, pesticide free’ produce. Do you see the word ‘organic’ in that request? No, you do not. Here is an example that may help illustrate the problem pulled from actual experience: If a Mexican/Israeli farmer can receive $2 per pound for organically labeled tomatoes or $.80 per pound for non organic, which box will they pack first? You have absolutely no assurance the tomato you are purchasing is really organic. You have to trust a whole list of people with your health and your money.

 

If your local commercial aquaponics company is offering ‘locally grown, pesticide free’ tomatoes, there is a much higher probability that what you are buying is exactly what is advertised because it is locally grown (in many cases you can actually visit the installation) and there are fish in the system to protect their health as well as YOUR health. If harsh chemicals or pesticides were used, the fish would die. [Weird to think that fish are protecting you and helping to deliver the best produce you can buy.]

produce marketIn today’s reality, is the money meeting the full faith and credit of the food industry? Can you be assured that the organic food you purchase is organic without testing each batch? No, you cannot. Today’s consumer is expected to blindly accept the word if an entire chain of people from farmer to packer to distributor to grocer and any one of them may inadvertently (or purposely) provide you with inaccurate information. This is not to say these people are deliberately dishonest, it is to say that the truth may not be known and it is VERY hard to verify their honesty.

Buying locally grown, pesticide free produce where fish are in the system gives you a much shorter and easily verifiable in the food chain from producer to your table. A local grower has a much greater incentive to provide exactly what they are advertising because the local people will spot a problem or a lie very quickly. Plus, the local producer is a member of the community and in many cases this alone will insure a measure of honesty.

However, growing your own food with a Portable Farms® Aquaponics System offers you full assurance that you are not using pesticides to grow your food.


 

Read Five New Ebooks About Aquaponics-Related Topics
Written by Colle and Phyllis Davis, Inventors, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems and Published in 2015

For more detailed information about these books: CLICK HERE.

ebookdownload

Commercial Aquaponics GOLD
COVER1

 

Listen to an important message from Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

Aquaponics GOLD

aquaponics gold High Resolution WEB

 Listen to Phyllis Davis tell you about AQUAPONICS GOLD.

Backyard Aquaponics GOLD

cover 3

An overview for those considering the option of installing an aquaponics system near their home.

 

Greenhouse & Warehouse Aquaponics GOLDgreenhouse book cover

This ebook discloses the facts, figures and formulas necessary for successful greenhouse and warehouse aquaponics growing. 

 

 Solar Aquaponics GOLD

cover 1

Let us show you HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE and HOW MUCH it costs to install your own solar powered system for YOUR aquaponics system.

 

Growing Tomatoes in Aquaponics

 Growing Tomatoes in Aquaponics
-by Colle and Phyllis Davis

tomatoe harvest with phyllis may 18 2013

Phyllis Davis harvesting vine-fresh tomatoes harvested from Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

toms may 17 2013

(Photo above) Each of these tomatoes weighs approximately 1/2 pound. We harvested them yesterday from a Farms® Aquaponics System. THEY ARE DELICIOUS.

Tomatoes are the single most requested crop to grow in the Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems. The expected yields in this article are based on growth from a single Grow Tray (shown below) and are very conservative. They are based on the lowest yield per plant, the shortest harvest cycle and the longest time a plant will remain in the Grow Table of the system. The actual production and yield is often two to four times the stated amounts in most cases especially after the operator becomes more skilled.

tomatoes colle may 3 2013

Colle Davis harvesting tomatoes

Tomatoes that have been planted and raised from a Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems can be sold as locally-grown and pesticide free and after certification can also be called ‘organic’ meaning the grower can receive higher prices based on their growing methods and further reducing the ROI than stated in this article.

GFIA Portable Farms® Aquaponics System - Tomatoes 6Tomatoes present an interesting opportunity because of two factors: The first is that all tomatoes must be staked or trellised (vertical growing) to maximize yield. This keeps the plants upright and allows the utilization of the entire column of growing space from the Grow Table’s surface to the area 2m (6 feet) or more above the Grow Tables. Trellising can be seen as a type of natural vertical gardening. Trellising also makes harvesting much easier because the fruit is more readily accessible. Pollination is also easier due to the open access to the blossoms. Circulating fans are very effective in the pollination of most plants and reducing the humidity and heat when the plants’ blossoms are opened up on trellises.

To successfully grow tomatoes and other blooming plants (peppers, cucumbers, beans, etc.) year round requires the use of Grow Lights suspended above the Grow Tables in a climatically adapted environment. The investment in the Grow Lights and electricity for the purpose of growing blooming plants is offset by the increases in both variety and production.

One of the challenges with tomatoes is to determine how long to leave the plants in the gravel before removing them and replanting in the same spot in the gravel. The recommended spacing on tomatoes is 30cm (12 inches) and not to offset the rows for maximum outreach of the plant’s growth. Our research discovered that the plants begin to produce tomatoes at 81 – 89 days (depending on conditions) but after approximately six to eight months of growing in the gravel, the tomato plants develop such a large root ball (the size of a football) that they began to impede the effective flow of water through the Grow Tables. This is especially true when a Grow Table was planted with only tomatoes. This root ball’s large sized necessitates the removal of the mature tomato plant after the sixth to the eighth month. The immature tomatoes can be harvested before the plants are removed to add to the overall production. The gravel in the area is then cleared of root fragments, and a new plant is immediately placed in the same spot. This process is thoroughly and carefully covered in the Operations Manual© provided with each installation.

Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, CEO of PFAS LLC, standing in front of a few tomato plants (10' tall) that supply hundreds of tomatoes while they're planted in a Portable Farms Aquaponics System. We generally leave the tomatoes in the grow trays about six months and then replant new tomatoes because their root systems grow too large (size of a football) for the grow trays.

Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, CEO of PFAS LLC, standing in front of a few tomato plants (10′ tall) that supply hundreds of tomatoes while they’re planted in a Portable Farms Aquaponics System. We generally leave the tomatoes in the grow trays about six months and then replant new tomatoes because their root systems grow too large (size of a football) for the grow trays.

 Tomatoes from a single full size 5′ x 40′ (200 sq ft) or 6’ x 32’ [1.5m x 12m (18m2)] Grow Table:

  • Each Grow Table can hold 200 plants (1ft or 30cm centers) and be planted twice per year
  • Production (harvest time) is normally over a 60 to 85 day period
  • The plants require a three month growing period before harvest begins
  • Year round growing is accomplished with the use of grow lights above the Grow Tables and a carefully acclimatized greenhouse or warehouse structure
  • Tomato plants bloom to fruit ratio is increased greatly with the addition of FF Mineral Rock Dust. FF Mineral Rock Dust provides aquaponics growers the perfect balance of many trace elements not consistently available from just plain ordinary fish poop. Now you can grow consistently blooming plants with the addition of FF Mineral Rock Dust, as your plants and your fish poop will now contain adequate levels of calcium, iron, magnesium and potassium, just to mention four of the vital elements for successful growing in aquaponics.
  • Staking or trellising is required and can be installed permanently
  • No pesticides, fungicides or artificial fertilizers are ever used
  • Tomatoes yield is between 5 and 9 lbs. [2 and 4k] per plant depending on variety
  • Yield per plant is 25 to 35 tomatoes per plant, depending on variety
  • Yield 55lbs [25k] per week
  • This level of yield give one 880 lbs. to 1,760lbs [400 to 800k] every six months
  • Or in one year 1,760 to 3,500lbs [800 to 1600k]
  • PLUS 330lbs [150k] of Tilapia per year from the Fish Tank below the Grow Table

Each Module contains one Grow Table, one Fish Tank and one Clarifier. The components to make the Module functional include the Portable Farms® Kit with the special pump and valve system, a control panel, air pumps and related hardware and wiring.

Each Module cost approximately US$3,300 completely installed. This does include the growing medium (gravel), but not the seeds or fish because the owner will be in charge of the seed variety and the fish will be procured locally at best prices.  The Modules require being housed in a climatically adapted greenhouse with one or more thermostatically controlled exhaust fans. In cold climates, more insulation is needed and in the tropics, the sides can be screen or netting.

By using the lowest yield with the shortest harvest season and two crops per space per year the Return On Investment will be approximately 55lbs per week at US$1.00 (very low price) or US$55.00 per week x 52 weeks = US$2,860 or a 1.4 year pay back. This does not include the greenhouse. In most cases this number will be much higher and will continue to rise as the operators become more skilled.

Please note: The above numbers are based on the lowest expected yields from field grown crops, using the shortest possible harvest time, plus the longest time from transplant to finish harvest. In other words, the lowest possible output from the Module for this crop is shown. The actual output from each Module can, and probably will be, from two to four times as high resulting in a much shorter ROI.

 


 

 

Read Five New Ebooks About Aquaponics-Related Topics
Written by Colle and Phyllis Davis, Inventors, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems and Published in 2015

For more detailed information about these books: CLICK HERE.

ebookdownload

Commercial Aquaponics GOLD
COVER1

 

Listen to an important message from Colle Davis, Lead Inventor, Portable Farms® Aquaponics Systems

Aquaponics GOLD

aquaponics gold High Resolution WEB

 Listen to Phyllis Davis tell you about AQUAPONICS GOLD.

Backyard Aquaponics GOLD

cover 3

An overview for those considering the option of installing an aquaponics system near their home.

 

Greenhouse & Warehouse Aquaponics GOLDgreenhouse book cover

This ebook discloses the facts, figures and formulas necessary for successful greenhouse and warehouse aquaponics growing. 

 

 Solar Aquaponics GOLD

cover 1

Let us show you HOW, WHY, WHAT, WHERE and HOW MUCH it costs to install your own solar powered system for YOUR aquaponics system.

 

Phyllis Davis Video about Portable Farms

 

 

Phyllis Davis harvesting ONE SINGLE HEAD of India Mustard, an Asian Green.

Phyllis Davis harvesting ONE SINGLE HEAD of India Mustard, an Asian Green.

biblettuce1

Phyllis Davis harvesting fresh basil from Portable Farms.

Phyllis Davis harvesting fresh basil from Portable Farms.

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